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EXPLORE NORTHEASTERN
Department of Chemical Engineering at Northeastern University
Healthcare Solutions

Research and technology brings innovation to chemical engineering. From growing new cartilage cells to help osteoarthritus, to improving drug delivery for cancer patients, chemical engineering offers new solutions to some of our greatest societal challenges.

Spotlight Stories

Ada Vernet
PhD, Chemical Engineering

1st-year Chemical Engineering PhD student Ada Vernet received an award for the Best Oral Presentation at the 3rd Baltic...

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Liyutha Al Ismaili
BS, Chemical Engineering 2020

She received the Undergraduate Early Research and Creative Endeavors Award. The Office of Undergraduate Research and Fellowships grants this...

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professor in blue lab coat with blue latex gloves and lab glasses works at table.

NSF CAREER Award to Fight Cancer

Sidi Bencherif, assistant professor of chemical engineering, recently received a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation to develop biomaterials that generate oxygen. These materials could help researchers understand how low oxygen environments affect the immune system and potentially be used to supply oxygen to help train immune cells to fight cancer.

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NSF CAREER Award to Address Cardiovascular Disease

Eno Ebong, assistant professor of chemical engineering, recently received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. She and her team are studying endothelial cells that line blood vessels to better understand how the blood flow environment and stiffness of the underlying tissue contribute to cardiovascular disease risk.

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Engineering in Action

World-Renowned Cooperative Education

Bradley Priem, BS, chemical engineering, had two co-ops that gave him the ability to delve into a particular industry. At Synlogic he was a bioanalytical chemist and bacterial engineer creating e-coli strains, and at bluebird bio he was an upstream process development engineer for gene production. He now knows he wants to go into the biotech industry and is interested in graduate school too.

Global Research Co-op

Taylor Wilde, BS chemical engineering student, worked in a research lab at École Normale Supérieure, a university in Paris. Wilde collaborated with a postdoctoral researcher to create nanomaterials using a chemical vapor deposition, or CVD, furnace. It helped him land his third co-op at GVD Corporation in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where worked again with a CVD furnace. Ultimately, Wilde wants to work in renewable energy and contribute to the efforts across the globe to lower society’s carbon footprint.

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Recent News

ChE Student Earns 2nd Place at Falling Walls Lab Boston 2019 Competition

Undergraduate chemical engineering student James Sinoimeri, E’21, working in the laboratory of Assistant Professor Sidi A. Bencherif, earned 2nd place at the 2019 Falling Walls Lab Boston Competition.

Chemical Engineering Student Wins Honors Early Research Award

Third-year Chemical Engineering undergraduate student, Lauren Gerbereux,  recently received the Honors Early Research Award for her research project entitled: “Optimization of Hypoxia-Inducing Cryogels”.

ChE PhD Student, Zach Rogers, joins Northeastern’s NSF I-Corps Program

Zach Rogers, a Chemical Engineering PhD student in Prof. Sidi Bencherif’s Lab, was selected to join Northeastern University’s NSF I-Corps Program with his proposal, “Hypoxia-inducing cryogels as a fast and inexpensive technology for hypoxic cell culture conditions”.

David Medina, a doctoral student at Northeastern, is using bacteria to produce nanoparticles that are particularly effective at killing whatever type of cell was used to create them, including strains of bacteria that are resistant to traditional antibiotics. Photo by Matthew Modoono/Northeastern University

Treating Antibiotic-Resistant Infections

ChE Professor Thomas Webster and his colleagues are using bacteria to develop nanoparticles that will combat antibiotic-resistant infections.